Communities

 Millbrook

Millbrook is a city in Autauga and Elmore counties in the State of Alabama. The population was 14,640 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Montgomery Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Learn More

 Millbrook

Millbrook is a city in Autauga and Elmore counties in the State of Alabama. The population was 14,640 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Montgomery Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Learn More

Montgomery

Prior to European colonization, the left bank of the Alabama River was inhabited by the Alibamu tribe of Native Americans. The Alibamu and the Coushatta, who lived on the opposite side of the river, were descended from the Mississippian culture, which had built massive earthwork mounds as part of their society about 950-1250 AD. They spoke mutually intelligible Muskogean languages, which were closely related. 

Learn More

 Prattville

 Prattville was founded in 1839 by industrialist and architect Daniel Pratt. The area was largely inhabited by Native Americans and a few settlers when Pratt, a native of Temple, New Hampshire, first observed the Autauga Creek in the 1830s. He purchased approximately 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) from Joseph May at $21.00 an acre and set out to build his manufacturing facilities and the town along the banks of the Autauga Creek. The location was chosen because the creek could supply power to the cotton gin manufacturing equipment.

Learn More

 Millbrook

Millbrook is a city in Autauga and Elmore counties in the State of Alabama. The population was 14,640 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Montgomery Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Learn More

Wetumpka

The name Wetumpka is a historic Creek place word meaning “rumbling waters”, supposedly a description of the sound of the nearby Coosa River as the waterfalls over the rapids of the Devil’s Staircase. It could be heard for miles before the construction of dams.[citation needed] The Creek named Wetumka, Oklahoma after their historic village after being forced west to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma), by United States soldiers by the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

Learn More

Deatsville

As of the census of 2000, there were 340 people, 130 households, and 101 families residing in the town. The population density was 73.2 people per square mile (28.2/km2). There were 150 housing units at an average density of 32.3 per square mile (12.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.35% White, 1.47% Black or African American, 0.59% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races.

Learn More

Tallassee

The historic Creek peoples in this area are believed to have descended from the Mississippian culture, which flourished throughout the Mississippi and Ohio river valleys and the Southeast from about 1000 to 1450. They were mound builders, who created massive earthwork mounds as structures for political and religious purposes. They relied greatly on fishing and riverway trading at their major sites (c.f. Moundville, Tuscaloosa). Some historians and archeologists postulate that in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, this verdant area had the second-largest permanent American Indian settlement in North America.

Learn More

 Millbrook

Millbrook is a city in Autauga and Elmore counties in the State of Alabama. The population was 14,640 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Montgomery Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Learn More

Hope Hull

Hope Hull, a stop on the Mobile and Montgomery Railroad was originally known as McGehee’s Switch in honor of local planter Abner W. McGehee. McGehee later changed the name of the community to Hope Hull, in honor of a Methodist circuit rider he met while living in Georgia.

 Pike Rd

The Pike Road area has been settled since around 1815; by the middle of the nineteenth century, a farming community had grown up near the intersection of two roads, Pike and Meriwether. Pike Road is so named because it was once a toll road, where people paid a fee or “pike” to travel on it.

Shorter

was originally called Cross Keys for the birthplace in South Carolina of an early settler, J.H. Howard. It was later named Shorter for former Alabama Governor John Gill Shorter. The town embodies the memories of the proud Creek Indian Nation, the Old South, and the Civil Rights Movement.